The Golden Chow: Rated Extremely Huggable

Introduction

Looking for a loyal and fluffy dog? However, have you ever considered a Golden Chow? This might just be one of the best choices from all the puppies and dogs available for you. These protective but gentle dogs are fantastic companions, but they are not the dog for everyone.

In this article, we will take a look at this remarkable mixed-breed dog. We’ll help you understand their appearance, temperament, and exercise and training needs. By the end, you’ll have a better understanding of whether this mixed-breed dog or hybrid is good for you.

What Is a Golden Chow?

A Golden Chow, also known as the Chow-Golden Retriever, is a hybrid of a Golden Retriever and a Chow Chow. It is an attempt to take the best of two wonderful dogs.

The history of the Chow Chow Golden Retriever mix is not well known. They have only emerged in the last 20 years as part of a growing trend to cross breed different purebred dogs. As such, it is generally considered a “designer” dog.

Some of these cross-breeds have been successful. The Labradoodle is a classic example. The hybrid is now standardized, meaning that owners know what they are getting when they buy one.

The Golden Chow has not got that far. The appearance and temperament of the dog can vary depending on the parents.

The first parent breed of this mix is the Chow Chow. The Chinese developed this dog more than 2,000 years ago as an all-around working animal. They served as farm animals, temple guards, and even army dogs!

Many people are wary of the Chow Chow. It is known for being aggressive and standoffish. Some insurance companies will even increase your rates if they know that you have one of these as a pet. Without proper socializing, this dog can be mean and scary. It’s not the best animal to have around small children.

Some famous Chow Chow lovers include Sigmund Freud, Elvis Presley, and Calvin Coolidge. Martha Stewart is also a fan and owns three. Their names are Empress Chin, Peluche, and Genghis Khan.

The other half of the equation is a lovable Golden Retriever. This breed is young compared to the Chow Chow. These dogs were developed in Scotland as hunting companions.

Golden Retrievers are one of the most popular family dogs out there. This is because they are obedient, affectionate, and easy to train.

The Golden Retriever Chow mix tries to capture the loyalty of the Chow Chow and the affability of the Golden. They are known for being fluffy, aloof, and devoted pets.

How Does a Golden Retriever Chow Mix Compare to a Purebred Golden Retriever?

Golden Chows can be very similar to Golden Retrievers—or they could be very different. The answer depends largely on your individual dog and its genetics.

As a hybrid, this dog tends to lean one way or the other. This is true for both appearance and temperament.

Chow Chows usually weigh in at about 50 to 75 pounds and will stand 20 to 25 inches tall. They are considered medium-sized dogs, but they are at the larger end of the scale. Both the Golden and the Chow Chow are somewhat big dogs, so this cross is no small pup.

Chow Chows can have a variety of appearances. Some will look like fluffier Golden Retrievers. Others might look like thinner Chow Chows. No matter what, you can expect a thick double coat that will need daily brushing. It will generally be more of a red or gold color, but this is not always the case.

An interesting characteristic that you might find in your dog is its tongue. Chow Chows are known for their blue-black tongues, and it looks like this is a dominant trait. Your dog might have a splotchy multi-colored tongue. The mouth will also probably be darker as well.

But lest that discourage you, check out this video of super adorable Golden Chow puppies. You’re welcome!

Temperament is where these dogs differ most from a Golden Retriever. This is because the two parent breeds are very different. Goldens love affection of all kinds, including from strangers. Chows are wary of people in general and are protective of their homes.

If your dog leans more towards a Golden, it will be an attention-seeker. It will also be friendlier towards strangers. It will have many of the lovable traits that you look for in a Golden but might be more reserved and relaxed.

A Golden Chow that leans more toward Chow traits, however, will not be as friendly. These dogs will be more protective of their homes and are suspicious of anyone who enters.

Should I Get a Golden Retriever Chow Mix Puppy?

If you are considering a Golden Chow, you should be prepared to change your lifestyle. These dogs will take up a lot of your time and energy when it comes to training and exercise. Ultimately, your dog’s needs are going to be dependent on their genetics.

If they are more of a Golden Retriever, they will be easy to train. Goldens live to please people, and they are naturally obedient. They are focused to the point of obsession and will work hard to achieve any task that you give them.

Goldens are also extremely active dogs. As hunting companions, they were bred to be outside and running around for long periods of time. Their favorite game in the world is fetch, especially if you throw a stick or ball into a lake or ocean.

If your dog is more of a Chow Chow, training will be more difficult. You will need to establish yourself as the alpha dog right away.

Chow Chows typically require more discipline than other dogs. This should never be physical though. Instead, give your dog a stern “no” and ignore it until it is ready to listen.

You won’t know which way your dog leans for a few weeks so try a mixture of techniques. You will likely find a unique training program that works for your dog.

It is important to socialize Chow Chows and Golden Chows from an early age. The Chow side needs to learn that other animals and people do not pose a threat.

The Golden Chow is only recommended to experienced dog owners. It also is not a dog for families with young children.

Conclusion

The Golden Chow is a difficult dog to raise. However, the reward is a sweet, loyal, and protective dog that will keep your family safe.

Already Have a Golden Chow?

Make sure you feed them with food that’s appropriate for them. Check out our feeding guide here.

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2 Comments

  • Avatar
    Kevin
    Posted March 27, 2019 at 7:51 pm 0Likes

    Where can I get these dogs does anyone have any chow golden retriever mix puppies for sale

  • Avatar
    AngelinaC
    Posted December 15, 2019 at 2:47 am 0Likes

    I had the awesome responsibility of owning a golden chow 6 years. He was a rescue and the vet said he was between 3 and 6 years of age when I got him. The first bit was tough as the person who pulled him from a kill-shelter failed to mention he was sick. So I had a week of yellow stuff from both ends.

    He was friendly from the start, but we deduced this beautiful, large dog had been crated by both a health issue and his STRONG desire to run away given any instant that presented itself.

    LONG, LONG walks twice a day improved the escape instinct, which I suppose suited the golden genetics, but not what you’d expect from a chow chow. Looking back, we explored the surrounding wilds for at least two solid hours a day. A tired dog is a good dog.

    He loved attention, but then would go take his naps or a bit of indoor toy play by himself. He loved car rides, mostly alone play in dog parks, strangers. He was frequently attacked by those small white toy dogs common here, whose owners NEVER kept their little attack toys on leashes. Once, he’d had enough and broke free from me. Trailing his leash I could tell he was determined to end that dog. Having seen him do the head shake with toys, disaster was only averted by the other lazy owner finally getting involved. Later he took to running by my side on a bike. Mine was, in younger years an astonishingly vigorous dog. Did I mention STRONG?

    Behavior: under no circumstances should you get a golden chow if you don’t have dog experience and a firm alpha personality. Training, behaving, taking medical care, several other issues, despite the common sense that a dog would tolerate and go along with things they like or are good for him, the golden chow at his roots wants to be the alpha. This, because of their size could spell disaster for you legally.

    In his old age he suffered with hip dysplasia. He’d snap when you were trying to help him because he was in pain, even with meds.

    He was probably the most attractive golden chow I’ve seen pictures of. He was MAJESTIC in appearance and bearing. People afraid of dogs would cross the street away from us. Never knowing the only danger was being licked to death. Adults he was good with, but he was not a fan of kids, like most chows.

    Three years he’s been gone…I still find bits of his hair. You are a slave to grooming. I’d give anything to be one again.

    I strongly advise no kids and no owners not alpha dogs already.

    Perfect dog for a 20 year old male athlete. Others, it will likely be a time consuming chore you might not even be able to handle.

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